How to Use a Pizza Steel, a Pizza Peel and Parchment Paper to Make the Best Homemade Pizza Ever!

How to use a pizza steel, a pizza peel and parchment paper to make the best homemade pizza ever

 

Have you ever heard of a Pizza Steel?  Until a month or so ago, I hadn’t.

But this one tool has transformed the way I make homemade pizza.  More than any other purchase for my kitchen, this pizza steel has made a huge difference in the outcome of our homemade pizza making.

Now we turn out pizzas with crisp crusts.  The edges are soft and full of air bubbles.  The pizza doesn’t droop when you pick up a slice to eat it.

Basically, our homemade pizza is pretty amazing.

I’ve already shared 5 Ways to Improve Your Homemade Pizza, the Best Homemade Pizza Sauce, and our Pizza Dough recipe.

It’s possible to get decent pizza results from a regular pizza pan or baking stone, but using a pizza steel is a game changer.

Homemade pepperoni pizza

What is a pizza steel?

I bought the Dough Joe Samurai.  It’s a 15″x15″ slab of steel that’s 1/4″ thick.  It won’t break or wear out, unlike pizza stones.

You place the pizza steel on the highest rack in the oven about an hour before you’re ready to bake.  Crank the oven as hot as it will go.  For mine, that’s 550 degrees.  I also turn on the convection fan, which gives it another 50 degrees.

The steel gets super hot.  Pizzas only need about 6 minutes of baking time when you use a steel.

The pizza peel.

You’re going to need a pizza peel as well.  The peel is how you transfer the uncooked pizza to the oven and then get the pizza back out again after baking.

I have this one from Epicurean.  Any pizza peel will work though.

How to get the pizza on and off the steel – parchment paper.

After trying flour and cornmeal on the pizza peel and still having the dough stick, I gave parchment paper a try.

We place the dough circle (sometimes ours isn’t as circle shaped as we’d like) on a piece of parchment paper.  Then pull this onto the peel.  Transfer the pizza on parchment to the hot steel in the oven.

uncooked pizza on parchment

 

In the photo above you can see an uncooked pizza on parchment paper.  It’s ready to go onto the peel and into the oven.

Six minutes later, I use tongs to pull the parchment and pizza back onto the peel and transfer it to a cutting board.  The parchment sometimes gets charred, but doesn’t catch fire or anything scary.

And it doesn’t interfere with the crisping of the crust.

leopard spotting on pizza

 

See the brown spots on the bottom of the crust?  That’s called leopard spotting and it’s what you want in pizza.  The crust was crisp, browned and perfect!

If you want to make really great homemade pizza, I recommend investing in a pizza steel and pizza peel.

Honestly, I’ve always thought that pizza was not something you could make at home and have anything that compares to getting it out at a restaurant.  But using the pizza steel has changed my mind.  Not that we won’t ever buy another restaurant pizza – that would be crazy.  But now I know we can have excellent pizza at home too.

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How to Make Homemade Pizza Dough

Homemade Pizza Dough Recipe

 

We’ve been talking pizza here the last few weeks.  We talked about a few pizza game changers you can use to improve your homemade pizza.

And I shared our favorite homemade sauce recipe.  It’s easy and simple so that’s an added bonus.

Today I’ve got a pizza dough recipe for you to try.  This is not a quick dough to make, but it is worth the time.  I adapted this from the free Craftsy pizza making class.  Mostly, I simplified and clarified the recipe.  The original recipe calls for measuring everything on a scale.

While I’m sure using a kitchen scale will yield more consistent results, I’m resistant for a couple of reasons.  First, I don’t own a scale and I know many (probably most) of you don’t either.

And second,  I think there’s something to be said for learning to trust your own judgement when it comes to working with any type of dough.  There’s a satisfaction in making something enough that you begin to know when it needs more flour or when it could use some water.  When to leave the dough to rest a while and when to keep working it.

I’m still in the process of learning to really know my way around the pizza dough, but I am learning.

Before I share the recipe, let’s talk over a few tips.   [Read more…]

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5 Reasons My Homemade Pizza disappointed Me and What I’m Doing to Fix It

5 Ways to make great homemade pizza

I’ve made homemade pizza many times over the years.

And I’ve been disappointed in my results quite a few times too.

From soggy crusts, to pizzas that don’t bake evenly to those that just don’t taste great. (To be fair, there have been many homemade pizzas we really enjoyed too.)

A while back I found a free Craftsy pizza making class.  It’s an online video course that comes with some recipes and shows how to really up your homemade pizza making game.

I watched the course recently and gave a few of the tips a try.  And I learned a lot about pizza making, even though my first attempt didn’t go quite as planned.

But I’m determined to master the homemade pizza.  I’ll be sharing tips and recipes with you here.  I’ve got a great sauce recipe to share.  And I’ve got a dough in the fridge right now that I have high hopes for.  It feels lovely already, unlike the last recipe I tried, which never gained the soft, elastic quality you want in pizza dough.

For today I want to share 5 reasons why I’ve been disappointed in my previous pizza making attempts and what I’m doing to fix that.

Baking in an oven that’s not hot enough

Pizza needs a seriously hot oven.  Way hotter than I ever would have guessed.  Previously, I would bake my pizzas at around 400 degrees.

But I’ve learned through the Craftsy class and other reading I’ve done that you really need to crank up the oven.

Turn it to 500 degrees or hotter.  Mine goes up to 550.  Then turn on the convection bake if you have it.  This will add 50 extra degrees to the temp.

With the oven heated as high as it will go, pizza will bake in just 5-6 minutes.

In case you’re wondering, baking stones such as you buy from Pampered Chef cannot take this kind of heat.

Proof:

pizza stone cracked

Takeaway – Turn up the oven the next time you bake.  But be sure to use a metal baking sheet or iron skillet if you don’t own a baking steel or pizza stone.

Pizza takes patience

Homemade pizza is not a 15 minute meal.  I love, love, love a quick dinner, but pizza is not in this category.

And I think that may be why I’m drawn to it now.  Learning to bake great pizza at home feels like a hobby and creative pursuit and less like the “get dinner on the table” routine that I do every day.

Good homemade pizza crust needs to be made at least 24 hours before it’s ready to be worked with.  The dough needs time to become strong and elastic.  Without that time, it won’t be possible to get it to stretch and form the crust.

Homemade pizza

Takeaway – Try making your crust at least a day ahead of when you’re planning to bake it.

If you want round crust, start with a round dough ball

Last week I made homemade dough, but didn’t separate it into individual pieces until I was ready to work with it.  I ended up with triangle shaped pizza crusts.  (My dough had a few other problems that didn’t help either.)

I’ve since learned that dividing the dough before storing in the fridge and storing the balls in a round container will help with keeping things round.

pizza dough in round ball

Takeaway – Store your dough already separated into pieces in a round bowl or dish.

Great flour really helps

I usually use bread flour for my pizza crust, but still wasn’t getting the results I wanted.  This time I bought King Arthur bread flour and it’s made a huge difference.  I could tell as I was running the mixer that this dough was a higher quality.  And as I worked with it, I knew for sure.

High quality flour that is high in gluten will produce the best pizza crust.

Homemade Pizza slice

Takeaway – Pick up a bag of high quality bread flour the next time you’re in the grocery.

Pizza tools are important

Pizza stones or baking steels that can take the heat are preferable to baking on a regular pizza pan.

I’ve recently ordered a pizza steel from Dough Joe.  These have the best price that I could find.  It’s still an investment, but it won’t ever break.  The steel is HEAVY!  15 pounds of metal.

dough joe pizza steel

 

We used this for the first time last Friday and I love it!  It’s a pizza-baking game changer!

Dough Joe also sells pizza stones.  I almost went with these.  They come as a 4 or 5 piece set, so they aren’t as prone to breaking as one solid stone would be.  They also aren’t as heavy as the pizza steel.

A pizza peel is essential for slipping the pizza into and out of the oven.  I have this one that I bought from Bed, Bath and Beyond.  I think it was in the Beyond section 😉

Takeaway – Consider purchasing a steel or stone and peel.  Or use your iron skillet to bake your pizza if you’re not ready to invest.

Pizza making parties are fun

I gather all the ingredients on the kitchen island.  Everyone gathers around to help work the dough, add toppings, talk and laugh.  We eat each pizza as it comes out of the oven.

It’s messy, noisy, delicious fun!

Takeaway – Invite your friends and family into the kitchen with you to experiment and have fun!

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